Central and Coastal Region (Ext) c

 

Badge Description

Scout emblem

Tropical Island = South to Northern extremes of the Great Barrier Reef

Fish: Jumping fish indicative of healthy Pacific Ocean and related fishing

Hard Hat = Industry inclusive of significant mining throughout west coast region

Sugar Cane = Sugar Cane agriculture

History

Central and Coastal Region was formed in 1983 [1].  The region oversaw country districts in locations from Maryborough to Mackay and the hinterland.  Field Commissioners provided professional support to the region, and administrative functions were carried out by a Regional Clerk at Queensland Branch Headquarters.  The Region was first administered by Deputy Chief Commissioner Alan Sherlock.  Shortly after, in 1983, the Region Commissioner was Lindsay Meyers, and the Field Commissioner was Bill Ferguson [2].  Central & Coastal Region merged with Capricorn Region in 2016 to form Central Coast Region [3].  The last Central and Coastal Region Commissioner was Dougal McWhinney.  Prior to the Region being formed, it was also part of the Central Queensland Zone in 1972, which was administered by Branch Headquarters in Brisbane, and districts were supported by Field Commissioners [4].  In 1991, further restructuring was carried out in a  Branch decision to move from two big country regions to six smaller country regions in line with the branch philosophy to decentralise the scouting areas. The Region Commissioner at the time was R. Hodda [5].

Districts and Groups

Central Queensland Zone districts (1972): Rockhampton, Port Curtis, Mackay, Bundaberg and Ceratodus districts [6]

Central & Coastal Region districts (1980): Nambour, Maryborough, Maheno, Bundaberg, Port Curtis, Rockhampton, Mackay. [7]

Central & Coastal Region Unattached groups (1980): Noosa, Cooroy, Pomona, Imbil-Mary Valley, Queen’s Park, Centenary, Theebine, Cayndah, Mundubberra, Monto, Biloela, Moura, Wowan, Mt Morgan, Blackwater, Springsure, Emerald, Gemfields, Capella, Clermont, Dysart, Moranbah, Proserpine, Collinsvale, Bowen, Whitsunday Coast. [7]

Central & Coastal Region Districts (1982): Bundaberg, Fraser, Gympie, Mackay, Nambour, Port Curtis, Rockhampton [8].

Central & Coastal Region Districts (1983): Bundaberg, Fraser, Mackay, Port Curtis, Rockhampton [9].

Central & Coastal Region Unattached groups (1983)Unattached Groups within the region: Biloela, Blackwater, Bowen, Capella, Clermont, Collinsvile, Dysart, Emerald, Gayndah, Gemfields, Middlemount, Monto, Moranbah, Moura, Mundubbera, Mount Morgan, Proserpine, Springsure, Theodore, Whitsunday Coast, Wowan [8].

Central & Coastal Region districts (1986): Bundaberg, Fraser, Mackay,  Port Curtis, Rockhampton [10]

Central & Coastal Region districts (2003): Mackay, Whitsunday [11]

Central & Coastal Region Groups (2012): Mackay City Central (West Mackay) Scout Group, Banksia (Andergrove) Scout Group, Sarina Scout Group, Moranbah Scout Group, Whitsunday Coast Scout Group, Bowen Scout Group [12]

References

  1. Fones, R. (1992). In the light of all the years. Toowong, Australia: The Scout Association of Australia-Queensland Branch. p. 133.
  2. Chief Commissioner (1983) Memo to District and Groups. Re-Structure of the Regions within Queensland Branch. 22.3.1983
  3. Scouts Australia, Queensland Branch (2016). Annual Report, p. 3
  4. Scouting in Queensland (1972). “Capricorn Coast Zone Conference Report”. Vol 11 (6), July, p. 4.
  5. The Scout Association of Australia, Qld Branch (1992). 84th Annual Report.
  6. Scouting in Queensland (1972). “South-East QLD Zone Conference”. Vol 11 (6), July, p. 5.
  7. Scout (1980). “Coming Regional Events: Central and Coastal Region”. Jan-Feb, p.47.
  8. Scout (1982) Area & District Directory, December, p.48
  9. The Scout Association of Australia, Qld Branch. (1983). Directory: Areas, Regions, Districts, Groups 1983.
  10. The Scout Association of Australia, Qld Branch. (1986). “Organisation of Queensland Branch” chart in: Scouting in Queensland. Heritage Centre Archive, Baden Powell Park, Samford, Queensland.
  11. Central and Coastal Region (2003). Newsletter, Issue 1 (March).
  12. Central and Coastal Region (2012). Annual Report. p. 8.